World Language

World language education focuses on the five C's: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities.

Communication: The communication standard stresses the use of language for communication in "real life" situations. Students are asked to read, write, listen and speak in the target language.

Cultures: Experiencing other cultures develops a better understanding and appreciation of the relationship between languages and other cultures, as well as the student's own culture. Students become better able to understand other people's points of view, ways of life, and contributions to the world.

Connections: World languages instruction must be connected. Content from other areas is integrated with world language instruction through lessons that are developed around common themes.

Comparisons: Students are encouraged to compare and contrast languages and cultures. They discover patterns, make predictions, and analyze similarities and differences across languages and cultures. Students often come to understand their native language and culture better through such comparisons.

Communities: Extending learning experiences from the world language classroom to the home and multilingual and multicultural community emphasizes living in a global society.

Grade-Level World Language Learning

Enduring Understandings

 En

In Spring Lake Park Schools, enduring understandings are...

Statements that clearly articulate the big ideas that promote long term understanding of the discipline or subject area that have lasting value beyond the classroom. These are the important understandings that we want students to retain after they may have forgotten the details (Brown, 2004; Wiggins & McTighe, 1998).

 

Essential Questions

 

 

In Spring Lake Park Schools, essential questions...

Focus our attention on what is important. They foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. They occur naturally and should be asked over and over (Brown, 2004; Wiggins & McTighe, 1998).

World Language Essential Questions include:

  • How are language and culture linked?
  • What is culture?
  • What value is there in learning another language?
  • What does it mean to be a member of the global community?
  • How can I effectively use technology to support my language acquisition?
  • How are language and culture interdependent?
  • What values are there in becoming multilingual?

 

K-12 Learning Targets

 

In Spring Lake Park Schools, learning targets...

Specify, in measurable terms, what all students should know and be able to do to achieve desired understandings and answer essential questions (Brown, 2004). These will be identified for each subject within each grade level.

 

Grade-specific World Language Learning Targets

Introduction to Spanish

  • I can understand and recognize, through listening, the most frequently used vocabulary in the Spanish language.
  • I can verbally retell stories using the most frequently used vocabulary in the Spanish language.
  • With feedback and support, I can verbally create stories using the most frequently used vocabulary in the Spanish language.
  • With feedback and support, I can produce written work utilizing the most frequently used vocabulary in the Spanish language.
  • I can read and comprehend texts that incorporate the most frequently used vocabulary in the Spanish language.
  • I can define culture.
  • I can identify and describe the elements of culture.
  • I can describe my own culture and can compare and contrast my culture with Spanish speaking cultures.
  • I can identify some Spanish speaking countries on a map. 
  • I can identify and assess how I impact and am impacted by the Spanish speaking world around me.
  • I can effectively use language tools to aid in my communication with Spanish speakers.

Spanish I

  • Describe and compare people or objects using descriptive adjectives
  • Family vocabulary
  • Engage in dialogue with greetings and personal introductions.
  • dates, numbers - 1 to 100, months, days of the week
  • I can ask and answer questions.
  • Use of question words
  • I can distinguish the difference between Ud.  and tú.
  • I can use the word no in order to make a statement negative.  
  • Recognize cognates.
  • Express preferences using gustar
  • Use the present tense 
  • Use Ir + a + infinitive
  • Use of subject pronouns 
  • Use of verb tenses  
  • Culture:
    • Product
    • Practice
    • Perspective 
  • Students are able to identify and describe product, practices and perspectives of a Spanish speaking  cultures.  
  • Comparisons:  Students should be able to compare and contrast products, practices and perspectives of their culture with cultures of Spanish speaking countries.   
  • Students should compare and contrast cultures amongst Spanish speaking countries. 
  • Communities:
  • Connections:  

Spanish II

  • Express opinions
  • weather and seasons
  • time
  • Grammar :   Definite, indefinite articles
  • Describe people and places using varied descriptive and quantitative adjectives. 
  • Use reflexive verbs
  • Formulate questions
  • Write a 3 paragraph composition including beginning, middle & end.
  • Review gustar and add impersonal verbs
  • Verb tenses:  past and present
  • Introduce subjunctive through storytelling
  • Introduced to direct and indirect object pronouns through storytelling. 
  • Accurately give and follow instructions. 
  • Exposure to multiple sources of media
  • Describe two or more central ideas in the text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text
  • Culture:
    • Product
    • Practice
    • Perspective 
  • Students are able to identify and describe product, practices and perspectives of a Spanish speaking  cultures.  
  • Comparisons:  Students should be able to compare and contrast products, practices and perspectives of their culture with cultures of Spanish speaking countries.   
  • Students should compare and contrast cultures amongst Spanish speaking countries. 
  • Communities:
  • Connections:  

Spanish III

  • Exposure to multiple sources of media
  • Describe two or more central ideas in the text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text
  • Writing a 5 paragraph, 500 minimum words persuasive essay, intro , 3 paragraph body, and conclusion
  •  
  • Create advancing descriptions of people and places using a variety of descriptive and quantitative adjectives
  • Formulate complete questions with or without question words. 
  • Be able to communicate in multiple settings. 
  • Express yourself in situations using:  doubt, disbelief, certainty, possibility and impossibility
  • Express and support opinions and personal point of view
  • Use verbs:   present, past, future , conditional and perfect tenses
  • Accurately use double object pronoun forms and structures
  • Review command forms
  • Be aware of the situations when subjunctive is used:   wishes, hopes, emotion, doubt, disbelief, impersonal expressions and indefinite antecedents
  • Introduce past subjunctive through storytelling
  • Culture:
    • Product
    • Practice
    • Perspective 
  • Students are able to identify and describe product, practices and perspectives of a Spanish speaking  cultures.  
  • Comparisons:  Students should be able to compare and contrast products, practices and perspectives of their culture with cultures of Spanish speaking countries.   
  • Students should compare and contrast cultures amongst Spanish speaking countries. 
  • Communities:
  • Connections:  

Spanish IV

Introduction to German

  • I can understand and recognize, through listening, the most frequently used vocabulary in the German language.
  • I can verbally retell and create my own stories using the most frequently used vocabulary in the German language.
  • I can read and comprehend texts that incorporate the most frequently used vocabulary in the German language.
  • With feedback and support, I can write stories utilizing the most frequently used vocabulary in the German language.
  • I can define culture.
  • I can identify and describe the elements of culture.
  • I can describe my own culture, and can compare and contrast my culture with German-speaking cultures.
  • I can identify the German-speaking countries on a map. 
  • I can recognize connections between my world and the German-speaking world. 
  • I can effectively use language tools to aid in my communication with German speakers.

German I

  • Describe self, family, and friends using names, ages, and common descriptive adjectives.
  • Engage in dialogues with greetings, introductions, and small talk.
  • Communicate basic needs and information about daily life, including numbers, weather, time, and dates.
  • Ask and answer simple questions including expressing opinions, preferences, likes, and dislikes
  • Write simple personal communications, descriptions and narratives.
  • Use appropriate greetings according to social level, time of day and situational circumstances.
  • Recognize cognates in readings,
  • Recognize and begin to develop understanding of proper agreement of nouns and adjectives in number and gender (mein, meine, etc.).
  • Recognize and begin to develop understanding differences in definite (der, die, das...) and indefinite (ein, eine...) articles.
  • Communicate using weak/regular verbs in present and past tense.
  • Identify similarities and differences between German- speaking cultures and US culture.
  • Recognize contributions of German culture and German speakers to US culture.
  • Comparisons:  Students should be able to compare and contrast products, practices and perspectives of their culture with German-speaking cultures.   
  • Explain some of the differences between German-speaking and US high schools. 
  • Communities: The students use the language both within and beyond the school setting. 
  • Connections: Understand importance of being multilingual. 
  • Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the target language and its cultures.

German II

  • Describe self, family, and friends using names, ages, and varied descriptive adjectives.
  • Engage in dialogues with greetings, introductions, small talk and personal descriptions.
  • Communicate basic needs and information about daily life, including food. 
  • Recognition of the changes to word order when involving time or emphasis. 
  • Know expressions to express injuries, aches and pains and body vocabulary.
  • Ask and answer simple questions including expressing opinions, preferences, likes, and dislikes.
  • Recognize cognates and some false cognates in readings.
  • Write personal communications, descriptions and narratives and cite evidence. 
  • Use appropriate greetings according to social level, time of day and situational circumstances.
  • Be able to communicate using house, city, and location vocabulary.

  • Communicate using weak/regular verbs in the simple present and past tense (perfect and imperfect).

  • Communicate using irregular verbs in the simple present and past tense (perfect and imperfect).
  • Express thoughts through construction of simple verb phrases using modal verbs + infinitive.
  • Use reflexive verbs and pronouns
  • Correctly use the various forms of the English verbs “to be” and to have in German in present and simple past tense.
  • Communicate future plans using the verb werden.

  • Culture:
    • Product
    • Practice
    • Perspective 
  • Students are able to identify and describe product, practices and perspectives of a Spanish speaking  cultures.  
    • Identify similarities and differences between German- speaking cultures and US culture.
    • Recognize some contributions of German speakers and cultures to US culture.
  • Comparisons:  Students should be able to compare and contrast products, practices and perspectives of their culture with cultures of German - speaking countries.   
  • Demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own. 
  • Communities: The students use the language both within and beyond the school setting. 
  • Connections:  Understand how learning German can help me be a better member of our global community.
  • Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the world language. 
  • Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the target language and its cultures.

German III

  • Engage in basic dialogues in the present and past tense related to travel, daily routine, surroundings, etc.
  • Make inferences about future events using visuals and previous knowledge of a story.
  • Comprehend spoken German (including slang) in the context of authentic, socially appropriate situations.
  • Negotiate a role-play situation (restaurant, travel, social, etc.)
  • Generate topic appropriate questions.
  • Write short paragraphs, simple letters and basic descriptions.
  • Know and understand subordinating and coordinating conjunctions in German and correct sentence structure when using each kind.
  • Recognize relative pronouns and be able to locate their antecedents.
  • Understand da- and wo- contractions and when their use is appropriate.
  • Be able to recognize the genitive case in reading and listening pieces.
  • Recognize adjective endings and understand why each word has a given ending (nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive).
  • Recognize definite and indefinite article endings and understand why each word has a given ending (nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive).
  • Identify cultural similarities and differences through authentic German films.
  • Become familiar with travel customs and arrangements in German-speaking countries.
  • Read and interpret German poems and short stories.
  • Understand how learning German will enable me to become a better member of the community.
  • Be able to teach young children beginning German.
  •  

German IV

  • Engage in detailed dialogues in the present and past tense related to travel, daily routine, surroundings, etc.
  • Comprehend spoken German (including slang) in the context of authentic, socially appropriate situations.
  • Generate topic appropriate questions for a variety of audiences (du, er/sie, Sie, etc.)
  • Know and understand subordinating and coordinating conjunctions in German and correct sentence structure when using each kind.
  • Recognize and use the four cases (nominative, accusative, dative, genitive) to communicate with increasing accuracy.
  • Recognize and use adjective endings (nominative, accusative, dative, genitive) to communicate with increasing accuracy.
  • Recognize definite and indefinite article endings and understand why each word has a given ending (nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive).
  • Demonstrate your oral proficiency through a formal class presentation.
  • Actively participate in four in-class interviews demonstrating speaking skills on select topics.
  • Actively participate informal small-group discussions.

  • Develop writing skills through an essay (rough draft, 1st
  • draft and an expanded second draft.)

  • Take the University of Minnesota Language Proficiency Exam in German. The goal is to pass all parts (reading, writing, listening and speaking).
  • Identify cultural similarities and differences through authentic German films.
  • Become familiar with travel customs and arrangements in German-speaking countries.
  • Read and interpret German poems and short stories.
  • Read and interpret a German novel.
  • Become familiar with basic facts and traditions of German-speaking countries.
  • Understand how learning German will enable me to become a better member of the community.
  • Compare and contrast basic structural language elements of German and English.

  • Identify German states, capitals, surrounding countries and major geographical features.
  • Write and film a short movie as a group project.