Social Studies

Students learn about themselves and others in relation to their school, families, community, country, and the world.

Students demonstrate thinking that reflects an understanding of civic values, explore the impact of consequences on themselves and their community, and discover similarities and differences amongst people, places, and events that have occurred at points of time. Students are engaged in collaborating and conversing with each other to share ideas and gain multiple perspectives. Students become global citizens by exploring their own place in the world, their values and their responsibilities to people, to the environment and to the world.

Grade-Level Social Studies Learning

Enduring Understandings

 En

In Spring Lake Park Schools, enduring understandings are...

Statements that clearly articulate the big ideas that promote long term understanding of the discipline or subject area that have lasting value beyond the classroom. These are the important understandings that we want students to retain after they may have forgotten the details (Brown, 2004; Wiggins & McTighe, 1998).

 

Essential Questions

 

 

In Spring Lake Park Schools, essential questions...

Focus our attention on what is important. They foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. They occur naturally and should be asked over and over (Brown, 2004; Wiggins & McTighe, 1998).

K-12 Social Studies Essential Questions Include:

  • What did happen in history?
  • Are some cultures superior to others?
  • Does the past influence the future?
  • Is history a socially constructed endeavor?
  • Where is the best place to live and how should you decide?
  • Who are you?
  • How can one person make a difference?
  • Who has power and how do they keep it?
  • What is wealth?
  • How is life better or worse with technology? Do we need technology?
  • Is it possible for a society to be self-reliant today?
  • What is the impact of diversity in the world?
  • Is conflict an inevitable outgrowth of diversity
  • What is an effective citizen? Does citizenship matter?

 

K-12 Learning Targets

 

In Spring Lake Park Schools, learning targets...

Specify, in measurable terms, what all students should know and be able to do to achieve desired understandings and answer essential questions (Brown, 2004). These will be identified for each subject within each grade level.

 

Grade-specific Social Studies Learning Targets

Kindergarten

Citizenship and Government

  • Demonstrate civic skills in a classroom that reflect an understanding of civic values. (0.1.1.1.1)
  • Describe symbols, songs and traditions that identify our nation and state. (0.1.2.2.1)
  • Identify examples of rules in the school community and explain why they exist; describe incentives for following rules and consequences for breaking rules. (0.1.4.7.1)

Economics

  • Distinguish between individual needs (conditions necessary to survive) and individual wants (conditions desired to be happy). (0.2.1.1.1)
  • Identify goods and services that could satisfy a specific need or want. (0.2.1.1.2)
  • Distinguish between goods (objects that can be seen or touched) and services (actions or activities). (0.2.4.5.1)

Geography

  • Describe spatial information depicted in simple drawings and pictures. (0.3.1.1.1)
  • Describe a map and a globe as a representation of a space. (0.3.1.1.2)
  • Identify the physical and human characteristics of places, including real and imagined places. (0.3.2.3.1)

History

  • Use a variety of words to reference time in the past, present and future; identify the beginning, middle and end of historical stories. (0.4.1.1.1)
  • Describe ways people learn about the past. (0.4.1.2.1)
  • Compare and contrast traditions in a family with those of other families, including those from diverse backgrounds. (0.4.2.4.1)

First Grade

Citizenship and Government

  • Demonstrate ways good citizens participate in the civic life of their community; explain why participation is important. (1.1.1.1.1)
  • Explain why and when the Pledge of Allegiance is recited; provide examples of basic flag etiquette and other demonstrations of patriotism. (1.1.2.2.1)
  • Identify the president of the United States; explain that voting determines who will be president. (1.1.4.6.1)
  • Identify characteristics of effective rules; participate in a process to establish rules. (1.1.4.7.1)

Economics

  • Describe some costs and benefits of alternative choices made by families. (1.2.1.1.1)
  • Define scarcity as not having enough of something to satisfy everyone's wants; give examples. (1.2.3.3.1)
  • Explain that people trade (voluntarily) when they each expect to be better off after doing so. (1.2.4.5.1)

Geography

  • Create sketch maps to illustrate spatial information about familiar places;
  • Describe spatial information found on maps. (1.3.1.1.1)
  • Use relative location words and absolute location words to identify the location of a specific place; explain why or when it is important to use absolute versus relative location. (1.3.1.1.2)
  • Compare physical and human characteristics of a local place and a place far away on a globe or map (such as a place in an equatorial or polar region). (1.3.2.3.1)

History

  • Create a timeline that identifies at least three events from one's own life. (1.4.1.1.1)
  • Ask basic historical questions about a past event in one's family, school or local community. (1.4.1.2.1)
  • Describe how people lived at a particular time in the past based on information found in historical records and artifacts. (1.4.1.2.2)
  • Compare and contrast family life from earlier times and today. (1.4.2.4.1)

Second Grade

Citizenship and Government

  • Demonstrate voting skills, identify rules that keep a voting process fair, and explain why voting is important. (2.1.1.1.1)
  • Explain the importance of constitutions. (2.1.2.2.1)
  • Compare and contrast student rules, rights and responsibilities at school with their rules, rights and responsibilities at home; explain the importance of obeying rules. (2.1.4.7.1)

Economics

  • Given a goal and several alternative choices to reach that goal, select the best choice and explain why. (2.2.1.1.1)
  • Describe the trade-offs of a decision; describe the opportunity cost of a choice as the next best alternative which was not chosen. (2.2.3.3.1)
  • Classify materials that come from nature as natural resources (or raw materials); tools, equipment and factories as capital resources; and workers as human resources. (2.2.4.5.1)
  • Identify money as any generally accepted item used in making exchanges. (2.2.4.5.2)

Geography

  • Create sketch maps to illustrate detailed spatial information about settings from stories; describe the spatial information found on the maps. (2.3.1.1.1)
  • Locate key features on a map or globe; use cardinal directions to describe the relationship between two or more features. (2.3.1.1.2)
  • Use maps, photos or other geographic tools to identify and locate major landmarks or major physical features of the United States. (2.3.1.1.3)
  • Use maps, photos, or other geographic tools to answer basic questions about where people are located. (2.3.1.1.4)
  • Identify causes and consequences of human impact on the environment and ways that the environment influences people. (2.3.4.9.1)

History

  • Use and create calendars to identify days, weeks, months, years and seasons;
  • Use and create timelines to chronicle personal, school, community or world events. (2.4.1.1.1)
  • Use historical records and artifacts to describe how people's lives have changed over time. (2.4.1.2.1)
  • Compare and contrast daily life for Minnesota Dakota or Anishinaabe peoples in different times, including before European contact and today. (2.4.2.4.1)
  • Describe how the culture of a community reflects the history, daily life or beliefs of its people. (2.4.2.4.2)

Third Grade

Citizenship and Government

  • Identify ways people make a difference in the civic life of their communities, state, nation or world by working as individuals or groups to address a specific problem or need. (3.1.1.1.1)
  • Explain the importance of civic discourse (including speaking, listening, voting and respecting diverse viewpoints) and the principles of majority rule and minority rights.(3.1.2.3.1)
  • Describe the importance of the services provided by government; explain that they are funded through taxes and fees. (3.1.4.6.1)
  • Identify the three branches of government (executive, legislative, and judicial) and their primary functions. (3.1.4.6.2)

Economics- consider a "market" unit to teach economic targets

  • Identify possible short- and long-term consequences (costs and benefits) of different choices. (3.2.1.1.1)
  • Describe income as the money earned from selling resources and expenditures as the money used to buy goods and services. (3.2.2.2.1)
  • Explain that producing any good or service requires resources; describe the resources needed to produce a specific good or service; explain why it is not possible to produce an unlimited amount of a good or service. (3.2.4.5.1)
  • Explain that consumers have two roles—as sellers of resources and buyers of goods and services; explain that producers have two roles—as sellers of goods and services and buyers of resources. (3.2.4.5.2)

Geography

  • Use maps and concepts of location (relative location words and cardinal and intermediate directions) to describe places in one’s community, the state of Minnesota, the United States or the world. (3.3.1.1.1)
  • Create and interpret simple maps of places around the world, local to global; incorporate the "TODALS" map basics, as well as points, lines and colored areas to display spatial information. (3.3.1.1.2)
  • Identify landforms and patterns in population; explain why human populations are unevenly distributed around the world. (3.3.3.6.1)
  • Identify physical and human features that act as boundaries or dividers; give examples of situations or reasons why people have made or used boundaries. (3.3.3.8.1)

History

  • Reference different time periods using correct terminology, including the terms decade, century and millennium. (3.4.1.1.1)
  • Create timelines of important events in three different time scales—decades, centuries and millennia. (3.4.1.1.2)
  • Examine historical records, maps and artifacts to answer basic questions about times and events in history, both ancient and more recent. (3.4.1.2.1)
  • Compare and contrast two different accounts of an event. (3.4.1.2.2)
  • Compare and contrast various ways that different cultures have expressed concepts of time and space. (3.4.1.2.3)
  • Explain how an invention of the past changed life at that time, including positive, negative and unintended outcomes. (3.4.2.3.1)
  • Identify examples of individuals or groups who have had an impact on world history; explain how their actions helped shape the world around them. (3.4.2.5.1)
  • Explain how the environment influenced the settlement of ancient peoples in three different regions of the world. (Early Civilizations and the Emergence of Pastoral Peoples: 8000 BCE—2000 BCE) (3.4.3.7.1)
  • Identify methods of communication used by peoples living in ancient times in three different regions of the world. (Classical Traditions, Belief Systems and Giant Empires: 2000 BCE—600 CE) (3.4.3.8.1)
  • Compare and contrast daily life for people living in ancient times in at least three different regions of the world. (Post-Classical and Medieval Civilizations and Expanding Zones of Exchange: 600 CE—1450 CE) (3.4.3.9.1)

Fourth Grade

Citizenship and Government

  • Describe how people take action to influence a decision on a specific issue; explain how local, state, national or tribal governments have addressed that issue. (4.1.1.1.1)
  • Describe tribal government and some of the services it provides; distinguish between United States and tribal forms of government. (4.1.4.6.1)
  • Identify the major roles and responsibilities of elected and appointed leaders in the community, state and nation; name some current leaders who function in these roles and how they are selected. (4.1.4.6.2)

Economics

  • Apply a reasoned decision-making process to make a choice. (4.2.1.1.1)
  • Define the productivity of a resource and describe ways to increase it. (4.2.3.3.1)
  • Describe a market as any place or manner in which buyers and sellers interact to make exchanges; describe prices as payments of money for items exchanged in markets. (4.2.4.5.1)

Geography

  • Create and use various kinds of maps, including overlaying thematic maps, of places in the United States, and also Canada or Mexico; incorporate the “TODALS” map basics, as well as points, lines and colored areas to display spatial information. (4.3.1.1.1)
  • Use latitude and longitude on maps and globes to locate places in the United States, and also Canada or Mexico. (4.3.1.1.2)
  • Choose the most appropriate data from maps, charts, and graphs in an atlas to answer specific questions about geographic issues in the United States, and also Canada or Mexico. (4.3.1.2.1)
  • Use photographs or satellite-produced images to interpret spatial information about the United States, and also Canada or Mexico. (4.3.1.2.2)
  • Locate and identify the physical and human characteristics of places in the United States, and also Canada or Mexico. (4.3.2.3.1)
  • Name and locate states and territories, major cities and state capitals in the United States. (4.3.2.4.1)
  • Name and locate countries neighboring the United States and their major cities. (4.3.2.4.2)
  • Use data to analyze and explain the changing distribution of population in the United States and Canada over the last century. (4.3.3.5.1)
  • Explain how geographic factors affect population distribution and the growth of cities in the United States and Canada. (4.3.3.6.1)
  • Explain how humans adapt to and/or modify the physical environment and how they are in turn affected by these adaptations and modifications. (4.3.4.9.1)
  • Describe how the location of resources and the distribution of people and their various economic activities has created different regions in the United States and Canada. (4.3.4.10.1)
  • Analyze the impact of geographic factors on the development of modern agricultural regions in Minnesota and the United States. (4.3.4.10.2)

History

  • Use maps to compare and contrast a particular region in the United States, and also Canada or Mexico, at different points in time. (4.4.1.2.1)
  • Identify and locate on a map or globe the origins of peoples in the local community and state; create a timeline of when different groups arrived; describe why and how they came. (4.4.2.4.1)

Fifth Grade

Citizenship and Government

  • Simulate a historic event to show how civic engagement (voting, civil discourse about controversial issues and civic action) improves and sustains a democratic society, supports the general welfare, and protects the rights of individuals. (5.1.1.1.1)
  • Identify a public problem in the school or community, analyze the issue from multiple perspectives, and create an action plan to address it. (5.1.1.1.2)
  • Identify historically significant people during the period of the American Revolution; explain how their actions contributed to the development of American political culture. (5.1.2.2.1)
  • Explain specific protections that the Bill of Rights provides to individuals and the importance of these 10 amendments to the ratification of the United States Constitution. (5.1.3.4.1)
  • Explain the primary functions of the three branches of government and how the leaders of each branch are selected as established in the United States Constitution. (5.1.4.6.1)
  • Describe how governmental power is limited through the principles of federalism, the separation of powers, and checks and balances. (5.1.4.6.2)
  • Identify taxes and fees collected and services provided by governments during colonial times; compare these to the taxes and fees collected and services provided by the government today. (5.1.4.6.3)
  • Explain how law limits the powers of government and the governed, protects individual rights and promotes the general welfare. (5.1.4.7.1)

Economics

  • Apply a decision-making process to identify an alternative choice that could have been made for a historical event; explain the probable impact of that choice. (5.2.1.1.1)
  • Describe various uses of income and discuss advantages and disadvantages of each. (5.2.2.2.1)
  • Describe the concept of profit as the motivation for entrepreneurs; calculate profit as the difference between revenue (from selling goods and services) and cost (payments for resources used). (5.2.4.6.1)

Geography

  • Create and use various kinds of maps, including overlaying thematic maps, of places in the North American colonies; incorporate the “TODALS” map basics, as well as points, lines and colored areas to display spatial information. (5.3.1.1.1)
  • Locate and identify the physical and human characteristics of places in the North American colonies. (5.3.2.3.1)
  • Explain how geographic factors affected land use in the North American colonies. (5.3.4.10.1)

History

  • Explain the construct of an era; interpret the connections between three or more events in an era depicted on a timeline or flowchart. (5.4.1.1.1)
  • Pose questions about a topic in history, examine a variety of sources related to the questions, interpret findings, and use evidence to draw conclusions that address the questions. (5.4.1.2.1)
  • Explain a historical event from multiple perspectives. (5.4.1.2.2)
  • Analyze multiple causes and outcomes of a historical event. (5.4.2.3.1)
  • Describe complex urban societies that existed in Mesoamerica and North America before 1500. (Before European Contact) (5.4.4.15.1)
  • Identify various motivations of Europeans for exploration and settlement in Asia, Africa and the Americas from the fifteenth to early seventeenth centuries. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585- 1763) (5.4.4.16.1)
  • Describe early interactions between indigenous peoples, Europeans and Africans, including the Columbian Exchange; identify the consequences of those interactions on the three groups. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585-1763) (5.4.4.16.2)
  • Identify the role of Europeans and West Africans in the development of the Atlantic slave trade. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585-1763). (5.4.4.16.3)
  • Compare and contrast life within the English, French and Spanish colonies in North America. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585-1763) (5.4.4.16.4)
  • Describe ways that enslaved people and people in free black communities resisted slavery and transferred, developed and maintained their cultural identities. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585-1763) (5.4.4.16.5)
  • Identify major conflicts between the colonies and England following the Seven Years’ War; explain how these conflicts led to the American Revolution. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754-1800) (5.4.4.17.1)
  • Describe the development of self-governance in the British colonies and explain the influence of this tradition on the American Revolution. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754-1800) (5.4.4.17.2)
  • Identify the major events of the American Revolution culminating in the creation of a new and independent nation. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754-1800) (5.4.4.17.3)
  • Compare and contrast the impact of the American Revolution on different groups within the 13 colonies that made up the new United States. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754-1800) (5.4.4.17.4)
  • Describe the purposes of the founding documents and explain the basic principles of democracy that were set forth in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754-1800) (5.4.4.17.5)
  • Describe the successes and failures of the national government under the Articles of Confederation and why it was ultimately discarded and replaced with the Constitution. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754-1800) (5.4.4.17.6)
  • Describe the major issues that were debated at the Constitutional Convention. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754-1800. (5.4.4.17.7)

Sixth Grade

Throughout

  • Evaluate arguments about selected issues from diverse perspectives and frames of reference, noting the strengths, weaknesses and consequences associated with the decision made on each issue. (6.1.1.1.1)
  • Use graphic data to analyze information about a public issue in state or local government. (6.1.1.1.2)
  • Explain why federal and state governments regulate economic activity to promote public well-being. (6.2.4.8.1)
  • Create and use various kinds of maps, including overlaying thematic maps, of places in Minnesota; incorporate the “TODALSS” map basics, as well as points, lines and colored areas to display spatial information. (6.3.1.1.1)
  • Locate, identify and describe major physical features in Minnesota; explain how physical features and the location of resources affect settlement patterns and the growth of cities in different parts of Minnesota. (6.3.3.6.1)
  • Describe how land was used during different time periods in Minnesota history; explain how and why land use has changed over time. (6.4.4.10.1)
  • Pose questions about a topic in Minnesota history, gather a variety of primary and secondary sources related to questions, analyze sources for credibility, identify possible answers, use evidence to draw conclusions, and present supported findings. (6.4.1.2.1)
  • Identify the push-pull factors that bring immigrants and refugees to Minnesota; compare and contrast recent experiences with those of earlier Minnesota immigrant groups in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980-present) (6.4.4.23.1)

Trimester 1

  • Including, describing the response of Minnesotans to global conflicts and displaced peoples since 1945 (post-World War II United States: 1945-1989)
  • Define citizenship in the United States and explain that individuals become citizens by birth or naturalization. (6.1.3.5.1)
  • Describe the establishment and expansion of rights over time, including the impact of treaties (6.1.3.4.1)
  • Explain the relationship among the three branches of government: making laws by the legislative branch, implementing and enforcing laws by the executive branch, and interpreting laws by the judicial branch. (6.1.4.6.1)
  • Identify the purpose of United State’s Constitution; explain how the Constitution organizes government and protects rights. (6.1.4.6.3)
  • Describe how laws are created; explain the differences between federal, state and local laws. (6.1.4.6.5)
  • Identify the major state and local (county, city, school board, township) governmental offices; describe the primary duties associated with them. (6.1.4.6.4)
  • Define federalism and describe the relationship between the powers of the federal and state governments. (6.1.4.6.2)
  • Compare and contrast the basic structures, functions and ways of funding state and local governments. (6.1.4.6.7)
  • Compare and contrast the Dakota and Anishinaabe nations prior to 1800 (6.4.4.15.1)
  • Describe European exploration, competition and trade in the upper Mississippi River region; describe varied interactions between Minnesota’s indigenous peoples and Europeans in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585-1763) (6.4.4.16.1)
  • Describe the movement of goods and services, resources and money through markets in a market based economy. (6.2.4.5.1)
  • Address a state or local policy issue by identifying key opposing positions, determining conflicting values and beliefs, defending and justifying a position with evidence, and developing strategies to persuade others to adopt this position. (6.1.1.1.3)
  • Explain the concept of sovereignty and how treaty rights are exercised by the Anishinaabe and Dakota today. (6.1.5.10.1)
  • Analyze how and why the United States and the Dakota and Anishinaabe negotiated treaties; describe the consequences of treaties on the Anishinaabe, Dakota and settlers in the upper Mississippi River region. (Expansion and Reform: 1792-1861) (6.4.4.18.2)
  • Describe how and why the United States claimed and settled the upper Mississippi River region in the early nineteenth century; explain the impact of steamboat transportation and settlement on the physical, social and cultural landscapes. (Expansion and Reform: 1792-1861) (6.4.418.1)
  • Describe the process of how Minnesota became a territory and state; identify the key events, individuals and groups involved in the process. (Expansion and Reform: 1792-1861) (6.5.5.18.3)
  • Create a timeline of the key events of the American Civil War; describe the war-time experiences of Minnesota soldiers and civilians. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850-1877) (6.4.4.19.2)
  • Explain the causes of the Civil War; describe how the debate over slavery and abolition played out in Minnesota. (Civil War and Reconstruction) (6.4.4.19.1)
  • Explain the impact of the Civil War on the lives of Minnesotans. (6.4.4.19.1)
  • Explain reasons for the United States-Dakota War of 1862; compare and contrast the perspectives of settlers and Dakota people before, during and after the war. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850-1877) (6.4.419.3)
  • Describe Minnesota and federal American Indian policy and its impact on Anishinaabe and Dakota people, especially in the area of land ownership. (Development of an industrial United States: 1870-1920) (6.4.4.20.4)

Trimester 2

  • Analyze how the rise of big business, the growth of industry, the use of natural resources, and technological innovation influenced Minnesota's economy from 1860 to 1920. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870-1920) (6.4.4.20.1)
  • Analyze the causes and impact of migration and immigration on Minnesota society during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870- 1920) (6.4.4.20.2)
  • Create a budget based on a given monthly income, real-world expenses, and personal preferences, including enough savings to meet an identified future savings goal. (6.2.1.1.1)
  • Describe the effects of reform movements on the political and social culture of Minnesota in the early twentieth century. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870-1920) (6.4.4.20.3)
  • Describe various types of income including wage, rent, interest and profit; explain the role that the development of human capital plays in determining one's income. (6.2.2.2.1)
  • Describe the political and social culture of Minnesota during World War I and how it affected Minnesotans. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870- 1920) (6.4.4.20.5)
  • Explain why federal and state governments regulate economic activity to promote public well being. (6.2.4.8.1)                                                                                                                                                     
  • Describe how the major cultural and social transformations of the 1920s changed the lifestyle of Minnesotans. (The Great Depression and World War II: 1920-1945) (6.4.4.21.1)
  • Describe political and social impact of the Great Depression and New Deal in Minnesota, including the increased conflict between big business and organized labor. (The Great Depression and World War II: 1920-1945) (6.4.4.21.2)
  • Identify contributions of Minnesota and its people to World War II; describe the impact of the war on the home front and Minnesota society after the war. (The Great Depression and World War II: 1920-1945) (6.4.4.21.4)
  • Give examples of economic changes in Minnesota during the Cold War era; describe the impact of these changes on Minnesota’s people. (Post-World War II United States: 1945-1989)(6.4.4.21.4)
  • Describe civil rights and conservation movements in post-World War II Minnesota including the role of Minnesota Leaders.  (1945-1989) (6.4.4.22.2)
  • Identify the major Minnesota political figures, ideas and industries that have shaped or continue to shape Minnesota and the United States today. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980-present) (6.4.4.23.2)
  • Describe the response of Minnesotans to global conflicts and displaced peoples since 1945. (post World War II United states: 1945-1989) (6.4.4.22.3)                                                                                                

Seventh Grade

  • Exhibit civic skills including participating in civic discussion on issues in the contemporary United States, demonstrating respect for the opinions of people or groups who have different perspectives, and reaching consensus. (7.1.1.1.1)
  • Identify examples of how principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence and Preamble to the Constitution have been applied throughout United States history, including how they have evolved (if applicable) over time. (7.1.2.3.1)
  • Explain landmark Supreme Court decisions involving the Bill of Rights and other individual protections; explain how these decisions helped define the scope and limits of personal, political and economic rights. (7.1.3.4.1)
  • Describe the components of responsible citizenship including informed voting and decision making, developing and defending positions on public policy issues, and monitoring and influencing public decision making. (7.1.3.5.1)
  • Compare and contrast the rights and responsibilities of citizens, non-citizens and dual citizens. (7.1.3.5.2)
  • Describe historical applications of the principle of checks and balances within the United States government. (7.1.4.6.1)
  • Analyze how the Constitution and the Bill of Rights limits the government and the governed, protects individual rights, supports the principle of majority rule while protecting the rights of the minority, and promotes the general welfare. (7.1.4.7.1)
  • Describe the amendment process and the impact of key constitutional amendments. (7.1.4.7.2)
  • Analyze how changes in election processes over time contributed to freer and fairer elections. (7.1.4.9.1)
  • Describe diplomacy and other foreign policy tools; cite historical cases in which the United States government used these tools. (7.1.5.10.1)
  • Apply reasoned decision-making techniques in making choices; explain why different households or groups faced with the same alternatives might make different choices.(7.2.1.1.1)
  • Explain how items are allocated or rationed when scarcity exists. (7.2.3.3.1)
  • Describe how the interaction of buyers (through demand) and sellers (through supply) determines price in a market. (7.2.4.5.1)
  • Describe profit as an incentive for an individual to take the risks associated with creating and producing new goods or starting a business in an existing market; give examples of how the pursuit of profit can lead to undesirable, as well as desirable, effects. (7.2.4.6.1)
  • Create and use various kinds of maps, including overlaying thematic maps, of places in the United States; incorporate the “TODALSS” map basics, as well as points, lines and colored areas to display spatial information. (7.3.1.1.1)
  • Pose questions about a topic in United States history, gather and organize a variety of primary and secondary sources related to the questions, analyze sources for credibility and bias; suggest possible answers and write a thesis statement; use sources to draw conclusions and support the thesis; present supported findings, and cite sources. (7.4.1.2.1)
  • Describe the processes that led to the territorial expansion of the United States, including the Louisiana Purchase and other land purchases, wars and treaties with foreign and indigenous nations, and annexation. (Expansion and Reform: 1792-1861) (7.4.4.18.1)
  • Identify new technologies and innovations that transformed the United States' economy and society; explain how they influenced political and regional development. (Expansion and Reform: 1792-1861) (7.4.4.18.2)
  • Identify causes and consequences of Antebellum reform movements including abolition and women's rights. (Expansion and Reform: 1792-1861) (7.4.4.18.3)
  • Cite the main ideas of the debate over slavery and states' rights; explain how they resulted in major political compromises and, ultimately, war. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850-1877) (7.4.4.19.1)
  • Outline the major political and military events of the Civil War; evaluate how economics and foreign and domestic politics affected the outcome of the war. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850-1877) (7.4.4.19.2)
  • Describe the effects of the Civil War on Americans in the north, south and west, including liberated African-Americans, women, former slaveholders and indigenous peoples. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850-1877) (7.4.4.19.3)
  • Explain the impact of the United States Industrial Revolution on the production, consumption and distribution of goods. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870-1920) (7.4.4.20.1)
  • Analyze the consequences of economic transformation on migration, immigration, politics and public policy at the turn of the 20th century. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870- 1920) (7.4.4.20.2)
  • Compare and contrast reform movements at the turn of the 20th century. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870-1920) (7.4.4.20.3)
  • Analyze the effects of racism and legalized segregation on American society, including the compromise of 1876, the rise of "Jim Crow," immigration restriction, and the relocation of American Indian tribes to reservations. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870- 1920) (7.4.4.20.4)
  • Describe the strategies used by suffragists in their campaigns to secure the right to vote; identify the 19th Amendment. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870-1920) (7.4.4.20.5)
  • Evaluate the changing role of the United States regarding its neighboring regions and its expanding sphere of influence around the world. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870- 1920) (7.4.4.20.6)
  • Outline the causes and key events of World War I, including the nations involved, major political and military figures.(Development of an Industrial United States: 1870-1920) (7.4.4.20.7)
  • Identify the political impact of World War I, including the formation of the League of Nations and renewed United States isolationism until World War II. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870-1920) (7.4.4.20.8)
  • Identify causes of the Great Depression and factors that led to an extended period of economic collapse in the United States. (The Great Depression and World War II: 1920-1945) (7.4.4.21.1)
  • Describe the impact of the Great Depression on United States society, including ethnic and racial minorities, and how government responded to events with New Deal policies. (The Great Depression and World War II: 1920-1945) (7.4.4.21.2)
  • Outline how the United States mobilized its economic and military resources during World War II; describe the impact of the war on domestic affairs. (The Great Depression and World War II: 1920-1945) (7.4.4.21.3)
  • Outline the causes and key events of World War II including the nations involved, major political and military figures and key battles, and the Holocaust. (The Great Depression and World War II: 1920- 1945) (7.4.4.21.4)
  • Identify military and non-military actions taken by the United States during the Cold War to resist the spread of communism. (Post-World War II United States: 1945-1989) (7.4.4.22.1)
  • Analyze the social and political effects of the Cold War on the people of the United States. (Post- World War II United States: 1945-1989) (7.4.4.22.2)
  • Compare and contrast the involvement and role of the United States in global conflicts and acts of cooperation. (Post-World War II United States: 1945-1989) (7.4.4.22.3)
  • Explain the economic boom and social transformation experienced by postwar United States. (Post-World War II United States: 1945- 1989) (7.4.4.22.4)
  • Compare and contrast the goals and tactics of the Civil Rights Movement and the Women's Rights Movement; explain the advantages and disadvantages of non- violent resistance. (Post-World War II United States: 1945-1989) (7.4.4.22.6)
  • Describe how new technologies have changed political, economic and social interactions. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980-present) (7.4.4.23.1)
  • Analyze the changing relations between the United States and other countries around the world in the beginning of the 21st century. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980-present) (7.4.4.23.2)
  •  

Eighth Grade

Citizenship and Government

  • Exhibit civic skills, including participating in civic discussion on issues in the contemporary world, demonstrating respect for the opinions of people or groups who have different perspectives, and reaching consensus. (8.1.1.1.1)

Geography

  • Obtain and analyze geographic information from a variety of print and electronic sources to investigate places or answer specific geographic questions; provide rationale for its use. (8.3.1.1.1)
  • Create and use various kinds of maps, including overlaying thematic maps, of places in the world; incorporate the “TODALSS” map basics, as well as points, lines and colored areas to display spatial information. (8.3.1.1.2)
  • Formulate questions about topics in geography; pose possible answers; use geospatial technology to analyze problems and make decisions within a spatial context. (8.3.1.2.1)
  • Use appropriate geographic tools to analyze and explain the distribution of physical and human characteristics of places. (8.3.2.3.1)

Geography- Trimester 1 (Physical and Environmental Features)

  • Describe how the physical and environmental features of the United States and Canada affect human activity and settlement. (8.3.3.6.1)
  • Describe how the physical and environmental features of Latin America affect human activity and settlement. (8.3.3.6.2)
  • Describe how the physical and environmental features of Europe and Russia affect human activity and settlement. (8.3.3.6.3)
  • Describe how the physical and environmental features of Southwest Asia and North Africa affect human activity and settlement. (8.3.3.6.4)
  • Describe how the physical and environmental features of East Asia and Southeast Asia affect human activity and settlement. (8.3.3.6.5)
  • Describe how the physical and environmental features of South Asia and Central Asia affect human activity and settlement. (8.3.3.6.6)
  • Describe how the physical and environmental features of Africa South of the Sahara affect human activity and settlement. (8.3.3.6.7)
  • Describe how the physical and environmental features of Australia/ Oceania affect human activity and settlement, including how the human populations have adapted to and changed the landscape differently over time. (8.3.2.6.8)
  • Describe how the distribution and development of oil and water resources influence the economy and societies of Southwest Asia and North Africa.  (8.3.4.10.5)

Geography- Trimester 1 (human Population and Cultural Characteristics 

  • Describe the locations of human populations and the cultural characteristics of the United States and Canada. (8.3.3.5.1)
  • Describe the locations of human populations and the cultural characteristics of Latin America, including how the contemporary pattern of cities resulted from a combination of pre-European contact, colonial, and industrial urban societies. (8.3.3.5.2)
  • Describe the locations of human populations and the cultural characteristics of Europe and Russia, including the role of migration patterns, and the impact of aging population and other effects of demographic transition. (8.3.3.5.3)
  • Describe the locations of human populations and the cultural characteristics of Southwest Asia and North Africa. (8.3.3.5.4)
  • Describe the locations of human populations and the cultural characteristics of East Asia and Southeast Asia, including how the demographic transition has influenced the region’s population, economy and culture. (8.3.3.5.5)
  • Describe the locations of human populations and the cultural characteristics of South Asia and Central Asia, including causes for the differences in population density in the region, and implications of population growth in South Asia on the future world population. (8.3.3.5.6)
  • Describe the locations of human populations and the cultural characteristics of Africa South of the Sahara, including the causes and effects of the demographic transition since 1945. (8.3.3.5.7)
  • Describe the locations of human populations and the cultural characteristics of Australia/ Oceania. (8.3.3.5.8)

History- Trimester 1

  • Describe varieties of religious beliefs and practices in the contemporary world including Shamanism/Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present) (8.4.3.14.3)
  • Describe how movements and social conditions have affected the lives of women in different parts of the world. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present) (8.4.3.14.6)
  • Describe how groups are reviving and maintaining their traditional cultures, identities and distinctiveness in the context of increasing globalization. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present) (8.4.3.14.8)

Government and Citizenship- Trimester 2

  • Explain why governments belong to different types of economic alliances and international and regional organizations. (8.1.5.11.1)
  • Explain how different types of governments reflect historically and culturally specific understandings of the relationships between the individual, government and society (8.1.5.12.1)

History- Trimester 2

  • Assess the state of human rights around the world as described in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present)( 8.4.3.14.5)

Economics- Trimester 2

  • Apply reasoned decision-making techniques in making choices; explain why different governments faced with the same alternatives might make different choices. (8.2.1.1.1)
  • Identify factors which affect economic growth (percentage changes in real Gross Domestic Product—real GDP) and lead to a different standard of living in different countries. (8.2.3.4.1)
  • Identify characteristics of command, mixed, and market-based (capitalist) economies; classify the economic systems of countries in a given region. (8.2.3.4.2)
  • Explain why trade is mutually beneficial to countries; define and apply absolute and comparative advantage with respect to international trade. (8.2.5.12.1)

Geography- Trimester 3

  • Describe independence and nationalist movements in Sub- Saharan Africa and Asia, including India's independence movement. (8.3.3.7.1)
  • Describe the impact of nationalist movements in the 20th century on contemporary geopolitics in Southwest Asia and North Africa.(8.3.3.8.1)
  • Explain how the changing patterns of industrialization and trade between the United States, and Canada or Mexico, have resulted in close connections between the countries in terms of manufacturing, energy and finance. (8.3.4.10.1)
  • Describe the impact of comparative advantage and the international division of labor. (8.3.4.10.2)
  • Describe the changing role of Latin America in global trade networks. (8.3.4.10.3)
  • Describe the role of Europe in the global economy today. (8.3.4.10.4)
  • Identify the characteristics of a market economy that exists in contemporary China; describe how China's changing economy has impacted the United States and the global economic system since 1970. (8.3.4.10.6)
  • Analyze the role of comparative advantage in the rise of the Indian market economy in the global economic system. (8.3.4.10.7)

History- Trimester 3 (Theme: A Changing Contemporary World)

  • Pose questions about a topic in world history; gather and organize a variety of primary and secondary sources related to the questions; analyze sources for credibility and bias; suggest possible answers and write a thesis statement; use sources to draw conclusions and support the thesis; and present supported findings and cite sources. (8.4.1.2.1)
  • Analyze connections between revolutions, independence movements and social transformations during the Cold War era. (The World After World War II: 1950-1989) (8.4.3.13.1)
  • Explain the major differences in the political and economic ideologies and values of the Western democracies and the Soviet bloc. (The World After World War II: 1950-1989) (8.4.3.13.2)
  • Describe political challenges and struggles of newly independent countries during the Cold War era. (The World After World War II: 1950-1989) (8.4.3.13.3)
  • Describe causes of economic imbalances and social inequalities among the world’s peoples in the post-colonial world and efforts made to close those gaps. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present) (8.4.3.14.1)
  • Compare and contrast the development of diasporic communities throughout the world due to regional conflicts, changing international labor demands and environmental factors. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present) (8.4.3.14.2)
  • Analyze how Pacific Rim countries have achieved economic growth in recent decades. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present) (8.4.3.14.4)
  • Assess the influence of television, the Internet and other media on cultural identity and social and political movements. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present) (8.4.3.14.7
  •  

Ninth Grade

Citizenship and Government

  • *Demonstrate skills that enable people to monitor and influence state, local and national affairs. (9.1.1.1.1)
  • Evaluate sources of information and various forms of political persuasion for validity, accuracy, ideology, emotional appeals, bias and prejudice. (9.1.1.1.3)
  • Analyze how constitutionalism preserves fundamental societal values, protects individual freedoms and rights, promotes the general welfare, and responds to changing circumstances and beliefs by defining and limiting the powers of government. (9.1.2.3.1)
  • Identify the sources of governmental authority; explain popular sovereignty (consent of the governed) as the source of legitimate governmental authority in a representative democracy or republic. (9.1.2.3.2)
  • Define and provide examples of foundational ideas of American government which are embedded in founding era documents: natural rights philosophy, social contract, civic virtue, popular sovereignty, constitutionalism, representative democracy, political factions, federalism and individual rights. (9.1.2.3.3)
  • Analyze the tensions between the government’s dual role of protecting individual rights and promoting the general welfare, the struggle between majority rule and minority rights, and the conflict between diversity and unity. (9.1.2.3.5)
  • Analyze the meaning and importance of rights in the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments; compare and contrast these with rights in the Minnesota Constitution. (9.1.3.4.1)
  • Explain the scope and limits of rights protected by the First and Second Amendments and changes created by legislative action and court interpretation. (9.1.3.4.2)
  • Explain the scope and limits of rights of the accused under the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments and changes created by legislative action and court interpretation. (9.1.3.4.3)
  • Explain the responsibilities and duties for all individuals (citizens and non-citizens) in a republic. (9.1.3.4.5)
  • Define the legal meaning of citizenship in the United States, describe the process and requirements for citizenship, and explain the duties of citizenship including service in court proceedings (jury duty) and selective service registration (males). (9.1.3.5.1)
  • Explain federalism and the provisions of the United States Constitution which delegate to the federal government the powers necessary to fulfill the purposes for which it was established; distinguish between those powers and the powers retained by the people and the states. (9.1.4.6.1)
  • Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I of the United States Constitution. (9.1.4.6.2)
  • Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the executive branch as enumerated in Article II of the United States Constitution. (9.1.4.6.3)
  • Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the judicial branch as enumerated in Article III of the United States Constitution. (9.1.4.6.4)
  • Describe the systems of enumerated and implied powers, separation of powers, and checks and balances. (9.1.4.6.5)
  • Explain the powers and operations of the state of Minnesota government as defined in its Constitution and its relationship with the federal government. (9.1.4.6.7)
  • Explain the powers and operations of local (county, city, school board, and township) government in Minnesota. (9.1.4.6.8)
  • Evaluate the role of interest groups, corporations, think tanks, the media and public opinion on the political process and public policy formation. (9.1.4.8.2)
  • Compare the philosophies, structures and operations of different types of governments in other countries with those in the United States. (9.1.5.12.1)

Geography

  • Create tables, graphs, charts, diagrams and various kinds of maps including symbol, dot and choropleth maps to depict the geographic implications of current world events or to solve geographic problems. (9.3.1.1.1)
  • Apply geographic information from a variety of print and electronic sources to interpret the past and present and plan for the future; provide rationale for using specific technologies for each application.(9.3.1.1.2)
  • Use geospatial technologies to develop plans for analyzing and solving local and regional problems that have spatial dimensions. (9.3.1.2.1) (9.3.1.2.2)
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions about the physical and human characteristics of places based on a comparison of maps and other geographic representations and geospatial technologies.(9.3.2.3.1)
  • Apply geographic models to explain the location of economic activities and land use patterns in the United States and the world. (9.3.2.4.1)
  • Identify the primary factors influencing the regional pattern of economic activities in the United States and the world. (9.3.2.4.2)
  • Explain how technological and managerial changes associated with the third agricultural revolution, pioneered by Norman Bourlaug, have impacted regional patterns of crop and livestock production. (9.3.2.4.3)
  • Describe patterns of production and consumption of agricultural commodities that are traded among nations. (9.3.2.4.4)
  • Describe the patterns of human population distribution in the United States and major regions of the world. (9.3.3.5.1)
  • Use the demographic transition model to analyze and explain the impact of changing birth and death rates in major world regions. (9.3.3.5.2)
  • Compare the population characteristics of places at a range of scales using population pyramids, birth and death rates, and other key demographic variables. (9.3.3.5.3)
  • Explain migration patterns in the modern era at a range of scales, local to global. (9.3.3.5.4)
  • Describe the factors influencing the growth and spatial distribution of large cities in the contemporary world. (9.3.3.6.1)
  • Analyze how transportation and communication systems have affected the development of systems of cities. (9.3.3.6.2)
  • Describe how changes in transportation and communication technologies affect the patterns and processes of urbanization of the United States. (9.3.3.6.3)
  • Describe the factors (transportation, government policies, economic development, and changing cultural values) that shape and change urban and suburban areas in the United States.
  • Use generally accepted models to explain the internal spatial structure of cities in regions in the United States and other regions in the world. (9.3.3.6.4)
  • Explain the spread of culture using the concept of diffusion and diffusion models. (9.3.3.7.1)
  • Describe the spatial distribution of significant cultural and/or ethnic groups in the United States and the world and how these patterns are changing. (9.3.3.7.2)
  • Explain how social, political and economic processes influence the characteristics of places and regions. (9.3.3.7.3)
  • Define the concepts of nationalism and sovereign political states and explain how sovereignty is impacted by international agreements. (9.3.3.8.1)
  • Describe the effects of nationalism and supranationalism on the establishment of political boundaries and economic activities. (9.3.3.8.2)
  • Analyze the impact of colonialism on the emergence of independent states and the tensions that arise when the boundaries of political units do not correspond to the nationalities or ethnicities of the people living within them. (9.3.3.8.3)
  • Analyze the interconnectedness of the environment and human activities (including the use of technology), and the impact of one upon the other. (9.3.4.9.1)
  • Describe patterns of production and consumption of fossil fuels that are traded among nations. (9.3.4.10.1)

History

  • Describe the political and military events that caused some North American colonies to break with Great Britain, wage war and proclaim a new nation in 1776. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754—1800) (9.4.4.17.1)
  • Analyze the American revolutionaries’ justifications, principles and ideals as expressed in the Declaration of Independence; (9.4.4.17.2)
  • Evaluate the United States' global economic connections and interdependence with other countries. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980—Present) (9.4.4.23.5)
  •  

10th Grade

Government and Citizenship

  • Analyze how the following tools of civic engagement are used to influence the American political system: civil disobedience, initiative, referendum and recall. (9.1.2.3.4)
  • Explain the current and historical interpretations of the principles of due process and equal protection of the law; analyze the protections provided by the 14th Amendment. (9.1.3.4.4)

History

  • Pose questions about topics in history; suggest possible answers and write a thesis; locate and organize primary and secondary sources; analyze them for credibility and bias; corroborate information across the sources; use sources to support or refute the thesis; and present supported findings.  (9.4.1.2.1)
  • Evaluate alternative interpretations of historical events; use historical evidence to support or refute those interpretations. (9.4.1.2.2)
  • Compare and contrast the motivations for exploration, conquest and colonization in North America by different European nations. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585—1763) (9.4.4.16.2)
  • Identify the varied economic, political and religious motives of free and indentured European immigrants who settled in North America. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585—1763) (9.4.4.16.3)
  • Analyze the impact of European colonization within North America on indigenous nations; analyze the impact of indigenous nations on colonization. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585—1763) (9.4.4.16.5)
  • Compare and contrast the development of regional economies and labor systems in the British North American colonies (New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies), including regional differences in the experiences of indentured servants, enslaved Africans and indigenous people. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585—1763) (9.4.4.16.6)
  • Develop a timeline of the major events and turning points of the American Revolution, including the involvement of other nations; analyze the reasons for American victory. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754—1800) (9.4.4.17.3)
  • Explain the origins of the two-party political system and the significance of the election of 1800. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754— 1800) (9.4.4.17.4)
  • Analyze the differential impact of technological change and innovation on regional economic development and labor systems. (Expansion and Reform: 1792—1861) (9.4.4.18.1)
  • Analyze how the expansion of United States territory and redefinition of borders affected the relationship of the United States with other nations, provided land for settlement, and resulted in political conflict. (Expansion and Reform: 1792—1861) (9.4.4.18.2)
  • Analyze changes in the United States political system, including the simultaneous expansion and constriction of voting rights and the development of new political parties. (Expansion and Reform: 1792—1861) (9.4.4.18.3)
  • Compare and contrast the regional economies, societies, cultures and politics of the North, South and West leading up to the Civil War. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850—1877) (9.4.4.19.1)
  • Describe the recurring antebellum debates over slavery and state's rights, popular sovereignty, and political compromise; analyze how the American political system broke down in the 1850s and culminated in southern Secession, the establishment of the Confederate States of America, and the Union response. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850—1877) (9.4.4.19.2)
  • Describe the course of the Civil War, identifying key political and military leaders, issues, events and turning points on battlefields and home fronts, in South, North and West. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850—1877) (9.4.4.19.3)
  • Describe significant individuals, groups and institutions involved in the struggle for rights for African-Americans; analyze the stages and processes by which enslaved African-Americans were freed and emancipation was achieved during the war. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850— 1877) (9.4.4.19.4)
  • Describe how the political policies, innovations and technology of the Civil War era had a lasting impact on United States society. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850—1877) (9.4.4.19.5)
  • Outline the federal policies of war-time and post- war United States; explain the impact of these policies on Southern politics, society, the economy, race relations and gender roles. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850—1877) (9.4.4.19.6)
  • Describe the content, context, and consequences of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments; evaluate the successes and failures of the Reconstruction, including the election of 1876, in relation to freedom and equality across the nation. (Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850—1877) (9.4.4.19.7)
  • Explain how technological innovation, heavy industrialization, and intensified boom-bust cycles of an unregulated capitalist economy led to changes in the nature of work, economic scale and productivity, the advent of the modern corporation, and the rise of national labor unions. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870—1920) (9.4.4.20.1)
  • Analyze how immigration and internal migration changed the demographic and settlement patterns of the United States population. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870—1920) (9.4.4.20.2)
  • Analyze how the shift to mechanized farming and industrial production changed patterns in social organization, consumption and popular culture, and domestic life, including the rapid growth of cities in diverse regions of the country. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870—1920) (9.4.4.20.3)
  • Describe "Jim Crow" racial segregation and disenfranchisement in the South, the rise of "scientific racism," the spread of racial violence across the nation, the anti-Chinese exclusion movement in the West, and the debates about how to preserve and expand freedom and equality. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870—1920) (9.4.4.20.5)
  • Describe the major political and social reform movements of the Progressive Era; analyze their impact on individuals, communities and institutions. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870—1920) (9.4.4.20.6)
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of political responses to the problems of industrialism, monopoly capitalism, urbanization and political corruption. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870—1920) (9.4.4.20.7)
  • Explain how the United States became a world power via trade and the imperialist acquisition of new territories. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870—1920) (9.4.4.20.8)
  • Describe the implications of United States involvement in World War I on domestic and foreign policy. (Development of an Industrial United States: 1870—1920) (9.4.4.20.9)
  • Describe the contributions of individuals and communities in relation to the art, literature and music of the period. (Great Depression and World War II: 1920—1945) (9.4.4.21.1)
  • Analyze the economic causes of the Great Depression and the impact on individuals, communities and institutions. (Great Depression and World War II: 1920—1945) (9.4.4.21.2)
  • Analyze how the New Deal addressed the struggles of the Great Depression and transformed the role of government. (Great Depression and World War II: 1920—1945) (9.4.4.21.3)
  • Describe the role of the United States as an emerging world leader and its attempts to secure peace and remain neutral; explain the factors that led the United States to choose a side for war. (Great Depression and World War II: 1920—1945) (9.4.4.21.4)
  • Identify major conflicts of World War II; compare and contrast military campaigns in the European and Pacific theaters. (Great Depression and World War II: 1920—1945) (9.4.4.21.5)
  • Evaluate the economic impact of the war, including its impact on the role of women and disenfranchised communities in the United States. (Great Depression and World War II: 1920—1945) (9.4.4.21.6)
  • Analyze the technological and societal changes that affected popular culture in the Post World War II era. (Post-World War II United States: 1945—1989) (9.4.4.22.1)
  • Compare and contrast market and command economic systems and their associated political ideologies; explain how these differences contributed to the development of the Cold War. (Post-World War II United States: 1945—1989) (9.4.4.22.2)
  • Analyze the role of the United States in Southeast Asia, including the Vietnam War; evaluate the impact of the domestic response to the war. (Post- World War II United States: 1945—1989) (9.4.4.22.3)
  • Analyze the causes and effects of the United States Secret War in Laos and how Hmong allies were impacted as a result of their involvement in this war. (Post-World War II United States: 1945— 1989) (9.4.4.22.4)
  • Explain the roots of the various civil rights movements, including African-American, Native American, women, Latino American and Asian American. (Post-World War II United States: 1945—1989) (9.4.4.22.5)
  • Identify obstacles to the success of the various civil rights movements; explain tactics used to overcome the obstacles and the role of key leaders and groups. (Post-World War II United States: 1945—1989) (9.4.4.22.6)
  • Evaluate the legacy and lasting effects of the various civil rights movements of the 1960s and 1970s; explain their connections to current events and concerns. (Post-World War II United States: 1945—1989) (9.4.4.22.7)
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of United States policies in ending the Cold War. (Post-World War II United States: 1945—1989) (9.4.4.22.9)
  • Describe the competing views about the role of government in American life since 1980. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980— Present) (9.4.4.23.1)
  • Explain how United States involvement in world affairs after the Cold War, including the global war on terror, continues to affect modern foreign policy. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980—Present) (9.4.4.23.2)
  • Describe various immigrant, migrant and refugee groups, including Hmong, Somali and Latinos who have come to the United States. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980—Present) (9.4.4.23.3)
  • Analyze the impact of twenty-first century technological innovations on society. (The United States in a New Global Age: 1980—Present) (9.4.4.23.4)
  •  

11th Grade

World History
  • Pose questions about topics in history; suggest possible answers and write a thesis; locate and organize primary and secondary sources; analyze them for credibility and bias; corroborate information across the sources; use sources to support or refute the thesis; and present supported findings. (9.4.1.2.1)
  • Evaluate alternative interpretations of historical events; use historical evidence to support or refute those interpretations. (9.4.1.2.2)
  • Describe the development, characteristics, and decline of civilizations in Africa, eastern Asia, and southern Asia; describe their interactions. (Classical Traditions, Belief Systems, and Giant Empires: 2000 BCE—600 CE) (9.4.3.8.1)
  • Analyze the emergence, development, and impact of religions and philosophies of this era, including Hinduism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Judaism and Christianity. (Classical Traditions, Belief Systems, and Giant Empires: 2000 BCE—600 CE) (9.4.3.8.3)
  • Describe the rise and significance of Islam in Southwest Asia and its expansion and institutionalization into other regions. (Post- Classical and Medieval Civilizations and Expanding Zones of Exchange: 600—1450) (9.4.3.9.1)
  • Compare and contrast the cultures of China (Yuan/Mongol and Ming) and Japan (Heian and early Shogunates), including the consolidation of belief systems. (Post-Classical and Medieval Civilizations and Expanding Zones of Exchange: 600—1450) (9.4.3.9.3)
  • Compare and contrast the cultures in eastern and western Europe, including the role of Christianity, feudalism and the impact of diseases and climate change. (Post-Classical and Medieval Civilizations and Expanding Zones of Exchange: 600-1450) (9.4.3.9.5)
  • Describe the intensified exchanges of scientific, artistic and historical knowledge among Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia; evaluate the impact on Christian and Islamic societies. (Post-Classical and Medieval Civilizations and Expanding Zones of Exchange: 600-1450) (9.4.3.9.7)
  • Describe the Reformation and Counter- Reformation; analyze their impact throughout the Atlantic world. (Emergence of the First Global Age: 1450—1750) (94.3.10.1)
  • Explain the social, political and economic changes in Europe that led to trans-oceanic exploration and colonization. (Emergence of the First Global Age: 1450—1750) (9.4.3.10.2)
  • Describe the interactions and negotiations between Americans (Mayans, Aztecs, Incas) and European explorers, as well as the consequences. (Emergence of the First Global Age: 1450—1750) (9.4.3.10.4)
  • Assess the social and demographic impact of the Columbian Exchange on Europe, the Americas and Africa. (Emergence of the First Global Age: 1450— 1750) (9.4.3.10.5)
  • Identify the major intellectual and scientific developments of seventeenth and eighteenth- century Europe; describe the regional and global influences on the European Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, and assess their impact on global society. (Emergence of the First Global Age: 1450—1750) (9.4.3.10.9)
  • Describe the causes and the regional and global impact of the Industrial Revolution. (The Age of Revolutions: 1750—1922) (9.4.3.11.1)
  • Explain the causes and global consequences of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Era. (The Age of Revolutions: 1750—1922) (9.4.3.11.2)
  • Describe the independence movements and rebellions in the Caribbean and Central and South America; analyze the social, political and economic causes and consequences of these events. (The Age of Revolutions: 1750—1922) (9.4.3.11.3)
  • Describe European imperialism; explain its effects on interactions with colonized peoples in Africa and Asia. (The Age of Revolutions: 1750—1922) (9.4.3.11.7)
  • Compare and contrast the approaches of China and Japan to Western influence. (The Age of Revolutions: 1750—1922) (9.4.3.11.8)
  • Describe the social, political and economic causes and consequences of World War I. (A Half Century of Crisis and Achievement: 1900—1950) (9.4.3.12.1)
  • Describe the rise and effects of communism and socialism in Europe and Asia, including the Bolshevik Revolution (1917) in Russia and the Chinese Revolution (1949). (A Half Century of Crisis and Achievement: 1900—1950) (9.4.3.12.2)
  • Trace the political and economic changes in China from the Communist Revolution until recent times. (The World After World War II: 1950—1989) (9.4.3.13.1)
  • Evaluate the degree to which individuals and groups have shaped the development of various post-colonial governments. (The World After World War II: 1950—1989) (9.4.3.13.2)
  • Analyze the social, political and economic impact of globalization and technological advancement, including the effects on the economies of developing countries and the impact on political power and political boundaries. (The New Global Era: 1989 to Present) (9.4.3.14.2)
  • Analyze the consequences of the transatlantic Columbian Exchange of peoples, animals, plants and pathogens on North American societies and ecosystems. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585—1763) (9.4.4.16.1)
  • Explain the origin and growth of the Atlantic slave trade; describe its demographic, economic, and political impact on western Africa, Europe, and the Americas (North America, Caribbean, Central and South America), including the impact on enslaved Africans. (Colonization and Settlement: 1585— 1763) (9.4.4.16.4)
  • Identify the sources of these principles and ideals and their impact on subsequent revolutions in Europe, the Caribbean, and Latin America. (Revolution and a New Nation: 1754—1800) (9.4.4.17.2)

Economics

  • Apply reasoned decision-making techniques in making choices; explain why different individuals, households, organizations and/or governments faced with the same alternatives might make different choices. (9.2.1.1.1)
  • Establish financial goals; make a financial plan considering budgeting and asset building to meet those goals; and determine ways to track the success of the plan. (9.2.2.2.1)
  • Evaluate investment options using criteria such as risk, return, liquidity and time horizon; evaluate and apply risk- management strategies in investing and insuring decisions. (9.2.2.2.2)
  • Evaluate the benefits and costs of credit; describe the “three C’s” of credit (character, capacity and collateral) and explain how these attributes can affect one's ability to borrow, rent, get a job and achieve other financial goals.(9.2.2.2.3)
  • Explain the pricing, sales, advertising and other marketing strategies used to sell products from a consumer perspective. (9.2.2.2.4)
  • Identify the incentives and trade-offs related to a choice made by an individual, household, organization or government; describe the opportunity cost of a choice; and analyze the consequences of a choice (both intended and unintended). (9.2.3.3.1)
  • Explain how the availability of productive resources and technology limits the production of goods and services.(9.2.3.4.1)
  • Compare and contrast the characteristics of traditional, command (planned), market-based (capitalistic) and mixed economic systems. (9.2.3.4.2)
  • Define broad economic goals and describe the trade-offs that exist between them; evaluate how different economic systems achieve these goals in theory and in practice. (9.2.3.4.3)
  • Describe the role of households, businesses and governments in the movement of resources, goods and services, and money in an economy. (9.2.4.5.1)
  • Describe the role of markets in the movement of resources, goods and services, and money in an economy. (9.2.4.5.2)
  • Explain that market demand is based on each buyer’s willingness and ability to pay and the number of buyers in the market; analyze the effect of factors that can change demand. (9.2.4.5.3)
  • Explain that market supply is based on each seller’s cost and the number of sellers in the market; analyze the effect of factors that can change supply. (9.2.4.5.4)
  • Use demand and supply curves to explain how the equilibrium price and quantity in a market is determined as buyers and sellers adjust their offers in response to shortages or surpluses. (9.2.4.5.5)
  • Explain how changes (shifts) in the demand and supply of an item result in changes in its market price and quantity; explain how these shifts can lead to changes in prices and quantities in other markets. (9.2.4.5.6)
  • Compare and contrast characteristics of various market structures.(9.2.4.6.1)
  • Explain the impact of various market structures on long-run profit, price, production, and efficiency in the market. (9.2.4.6.2)
  • Explain the role of productivity, human capital, demographics and government policies in determining wage rates and income in labor markets. (9.2.4.7.1)
  • Describe commodities as natural resources necessary to produce goods and services; explain how world events and market speculation can affect commodity and other prices. (9.2.4.7.3)
  • Identify and analyze market failures caused by a lack of competition, lack of resource mobility (barriers), and lack of perfect information; evaluate the rationale and effectiveness of government attempts to remedy these problems.(9.2.4.8.1)
  • Identify and analyze market failures caused by poorly defined or poorly enforced property rights, externalities, and public goods; evaluate the rationale and effectiveness of government attempts to remedy these problems. (9.2.4.8.2)
  • Identify measures of income distribution, wealth distribution and poverty, and explain how these affect, and are affected by, the economy; evaluate the effectiveness of, and incentives created by, government income redistribution programs. (9.2.4.8.3)
  • Measure economic growth in terms of percentage changes in real Gross Domestic Product over time; analyze past and recent data to identify factors that promote or impair long-run economic growth and its sustainability. (9.2.5.9.1)
  • Measure inflation in terms of a percentage change in a price index; analyze past and recent data to explain how the money supply is related to long-run inflation with the equation of exchange. (9.2.5.9.2)
  • Measure full employment in terms of the unemployment rate and various types of unemployment; analyze past and recent data to describe factors that impact the long-run growth of jobs in an economy. (9.2.5.9.3)
  • Describe factors that can lead to changes in short-run total spending (by households, businesses, governments and foreigners) and changes in short-run output. (9.2.5.10.1)
  • Use a short-run aggregate demand and aggregate supply model to describe changes in output, employment and the price level. (9.2.5.10.2)
  • Explain how various government fiscal policies are likely to impact overall output, employment and the price level. (9.2.5.11.1)
  • Describe how various monetary policies of the Federal Reserve are implemented; explain how they are likely to impact overall output, employment, and the price level.(9.2.5.11.2)
  • Apply the principles of absolute and comparative advantage to explain the increase in world production due to specialization and trade; identify the groups that benefit and lose with free- trade treaties, trading blocs and trade barriers. (9.2.5.12.1)
  • Explain how the demand and supply of currencies determines exchange rates and, in turn, affects trade. (9.2.5.12.2)

 

12th Grade

Citizenship and Government

  • Demonstrate skills that enable people to monitor and influence state, local and national affairs. (9.1.1.1.1)
  • Demonstrate the skills necessary to participate in the election process, including registering to vote, identifying and evaluating candidates and issues, and casting a ballot. (9.1.1.1.2)
  • Evaluate sources of information and various forms of political persuasion for validity, accuracy, ideology, emotional appeals, bias and prejudice. (9.1.1.1.3)
  • Examine a public policy issue by defining the problem, developing alternative courses of action, evaluating the consequences of each alternative, selecting a course of action, and designing a plan to implement the action and resolve the problem.  (9.1.1.1.4)
  • Analyze how constitutionalism preserves fundamental societal values, protects individual freedoms and rights, promotes the general welfare, and responds to changing circumstances and beliefs by defining and limiting the powers of government. (9.1.2.3.1)
  • Analyze the tensions between the government’s dual role of protecting individual rights and promoting the general welfare, the struggle between majority rule and minority rights, and the conflict between diversity and unity. (9.1.2.3.5)
  • Explain the scope and limits of rights protected by the First and Second Amendments and changes created by legislative action and court interpretation. (9.1.3.4.2)
  • Explain the scope and limits of rights of the accused under the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments and changes created by legislative action and court interpretation. (9.1.3.4.3)
  • Describe the process of naturalization; explain the role of the federal government in establishing immigration policies. (9.1.3.5.2)
  • Explain federalism and the provisions of the United States Constitution which delegate to the federal government the powers necessary to fulfill the purposes for which it was established; distinguish between those powers and the powers retained by the people and the states. (9.1.4.6.1)
  • Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I of the United States Constitution. (9.1.4.6.2)
  • Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the executive branch as enumerated in Article II of the United States Constitution. (9.1.4.6.3)
  • Explain the purposes, organization, functions and processes of the judicial branch as enumerated in Article III of the United States Constitution. (9.1.4.6.4)
  • Evaluate the importance of an independent judiciary, judicial review and the rule of law. (9.1.4.6.6)
  • Compare and contrast the budgets of the United States and Minnesota governments describing the major sources of revenue and categories of spending for each. (9.1.4.6.9)
  • Describe the purposes, types, and sources of laws and rules.(9.1.4.7.1)
  • Evaluate the impact of political parties on elections and public policy formation. (9.1.4.8.1)
  • Evaluate the role of interest groups, corporations, think tanks, the media and public opinion on the political process and public policy formation. (9.1.4.8.2)
  • Analyze how the United States political system is shaped by elections and the election process, including the caucus system and procedures involved in voting. (9.1.4.9.1)
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of diplomacy and other foreign policy tools used by the United States government and other nations in historical or contemporary times. (9.1.5.10.2)
  • Explain why governments interact in world affairs; describe how the United States government develops and carries out United States foreign policy, including treaty-making. (9.1.5.10.3)
  • Describe how individuals, businesses, labor and other groups influence United States foreign policy. (9.1.5.11.1)
  • Explain the role of international law in world affairs; evaluate the impact of the participation of nation states in international organizations. (9.1.5.11.2)

Current Issues

  • The students will identify and analyze areas of conflict, compromise, and agreement among various groups concerning specific current issues.
  • Students will identify a current global event or issue, organize and synthesize research on multiple sides of the issue, formulate a position, debate with others, propose appropriate solution(s), formulate an action plan and assess the positive and negative results of actions proposed.
  • The students will assess how current issues impact the world, nation, and individuals.
  • Evaluate the political, social and economic costs of a national issue.
  • Analyze how the development and use of technology and the media has influenced the ways people define and act on issues (economic, political, ethical or social issue).

Psychology

  • Students will know the theoretical foundations and the contributions of early pioneers in the study of human behavior.
  • Students will know scientific methods and statistical analysis of data.
  • Students will analyze the different theoretical perspectives on personality development and various techniques of personality measurement.
  • Students will analyze the different behaviors of individuals with minor and major mental disorders and various treatment techniques.
  • Students will understand the basic building blocks of memory and learning through the analysis of various conditioning techniques.
  • Students will analyze the relationship between our sensations and perceptions and they will also understand basic parts and functions of the human brain.
  • Students will understand how motivational drives control behavior and emotions and they will also analyze different levels of consciousness and their impact on behavior.
  • Students will discover the scientific study of human behavior in the completion and presentation of their own experiment.

Sociology

  • Students will examine the study of society.
  • Students will apply the sociological method of inquiry to draw conclusions on human behavior.
  • The students examine the individual in society.
  • The students will explain stratification and the societal effect of social inequalities.

 

 

 

  •